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A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times
7: Adult Freeholders — Elias Van Gyseling

Prof. Jonathan Pearson

Go back to: Adult Freeholders | Van Esselsteyn | ahead to: Van Hoek

[This information is from pp. 181-182 of A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times; being contributions toward a history of the lower Mohawk Valley by Jonathan Pearson, A. M. and others, edited by J. W. MacMurray, A. M., U. S. A. (Albany, NY: J. Munsell's Sons, Printers, 1883). It is in the Schenectady Collection of the Schenectady County Public Library at Schdy R 974.744 P36, and copies are also available for borrowing.]

[Copies of this book are available from the Schenectady County Historical Society.]

[The original version uses assorted typographical symbols to represent footnotes. To improve legibility, the online version uses the form (page number - note number.)]

He came to New Netherland in 1659, from Zeeland, in the ship Bonte Koe and settled first at Beverwyck. "Sprekende goet Frans" he was sometimes employed as an interpreter. His wife, Tryntje Claase, after his death married Willem Hall in 1695.

In 1670, he came to Schenectady and with Pieter Cornelise Vielè purchased Bastiaen De Winter's farm, described as "a parcel of land at Schenectady, wide on the west side 350 rods, long on the north side 60 rods, lying by the first land of Willem Teller and Maritie Damens [Van Eps], according to patent of 21st October, 1670 from Governor Lovelace." (181-6)

This farm usually called "Elias' plantasie" remained in the Van Gyseling family until the death of the late Mr. Cornelius Van Gyseling, in 1865, when it passed into the possession of his stepson Mr. John C. Perry, the present occupant. One of the oldest dwellings in this region (possibly built by Elias Van Gyseling but more probably by his son Myndert) (182-1, is still standing on this farm.

On his death, about 1694, his eldest son, Myndert, succeeded him.

His second son Jacob resided in the village upon a lot conveyed to him by Reyer Schermerhorn [trustee] March 1713/4, and described as "a lot on the north side of the town with house, barn and orchard, bounded easterly by the lot of heirs of Samuel Bratt, length from the river to the street 550 feet, south by the [Front] street in breadth 155 feet, bounded [westerly] on the house and lot of the heirs of Philip Philipse deceased 162 feet, south by said heirs of Philip Philipse deceased 75 ft., west by the old brewhouse [of the Glens], 294 feet and north by the river 255 feet." This lot containing about 21 acres was probably purchased of Arent Bratt the former owner, but conveyed by Reyer Schermerhorn as being the sole surviving patentee of the town by the patent of 1684. It commenced at a point on the north side of Front street 100 feet easterly from Washington street and extended easterly to the west line of the lot of the late Nicholas Cain excepting the lot of heirs of Philip Philipse 75 x 162 feet. In 1725-32, it belonged to Myndert Van Gyseling. (182-2)

Notes

(181-6) Deeds, II, 789; see also De Winter.

(182-1) [Myndert was married in 1721, — died in 1771, between which dates he probably built this house. — M'M.]

(182-2) Deeds, V, 199, 220.

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