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See Also: Schermerhorn Family Genealogy

A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times
7: Adult Freeholders — Schermerhorn

Prof. Jonathan Pearson

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[This information is from p. 141 of A History of the Schenectady Patent in the Dutch and English Times; being contributions toward a history of the lower Mohawk Valley by Jonathan Pearson, A. M. and others, edited by J. W. MacMurray, A. M., U. S. A. (Albany, NY: J. Munsell's Sons, Printers, 1883). It is in the Schenectady Collection of the Schenectady County Public Library at Schdy R 974.744 P36, and copies are also available for borrowing.]

[Copies of this book are available from the Schenectady County Historical Society.]

[The original version uses assorted typographical symbols to represent footnotes. To improve legibility, the online version uses the form (page number - note number.)]

Jacob Janse Schermerhorn, the first settler, is said to have been born in Waterland, Holland, in 1622. (141-1) He came to Beverwyck quite early, where he prospered as a brewer and trader. In 1648 he was arrested at Fort Orange, by order of Governor Stuyvesant on a charge of selling arms and ammunition to the Indians. His books and papers were seized and himself removed, a prisoner, to Fort Amsterdam, — where he was sentenced to banishment for five years, with the confiscation of all his property. By the interference of some leading citizens, the first part of the sentence was struck out, but his property was never recovered. These severe proceedings against Schermerhorn formed subsequently a ground of complaint against Stuyvesant, to the States General. (141-2) Nothing daunted by his misfortunes, he began anew, and before his death in 1689, acquired a large property for the times. He made his will May 20, 1688, and the year following died at Schenectady, where he had resided for some years.

By his will he gave "to my eldest son Reyer before partition of my estate my lot at the river side in Albany, where Kleyn De Goyer (141-3) lived, — my wife to have during her widowhood the rents and profits of all my real estate, viz., my farm at Shotac [Schodac], — pasture over against Marten Gerritse's island, two houses and lots in Albany, the one over against Isaac Verplanck, the other where my son Symon lives; — my house and lot at Schenectady where I now dwell, — to my wife all my movable property." His son Jacob lived on his farm at Schotak. After his and his wife's death, his property was to be divided equally among his nine children. (141-4) At the final settlement of his estate, it was inventoried at 56,882 guilders.

Notes

(141-1) O'Callaghan's Hist. N. N., II, 63 note, 587; I, 436, 441; Deeds, II. In 1648 he was at South [Delaware] river. — O'Callaghan's Hist. N. N., II, 81.

(141-2) Col. Doc., I, 312, 337, 345, 428; II, 459; III, 179.

(141-3) [De Goyer = the thrower — caster-pitcher. — M'M.]

(141-4) Wills, I, 26.

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See Also: Schermerhorn Family Genealogy

http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/resources/patent/schermerhorn_j.html updated September 28, 2013

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